Case Study: Retiring With $1,000,000

Case Study: Retiring With $1,000,000

Those of you who know me know that I’m a massive baseball fan.  And when it comes to famous quotes from baseball players, one person comes to mind more than any other: Yogi Berra.

Yogi Berra was a long time catcher for the Yankees and had an incredible hall of fame career.  He was equally known for his head-scratching quotes, which the world has affectionately termed “Yogi-isms.”  Yogi didn’t comment often on financial topics, but he does have one quote that applies nicely to retirement planning:

“A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore.”

When we think about retirement planning, many people consider $1,000,000 as kind of a “golden threshold.”  They think of a million dollars as the minimum nest egg they’ll need in order to retire comfortably.  But as Yogi pointed out, being a millionaire doesn’t amount to what it used to.

So is it even possible to retire with $1,000,000 these days?

Let’s find out.  In this post we’ll explore a hypothetical couple named John and Jane.  They’ve saved $1,000,000 and want to retire, which is a very common situation for many Americans.

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What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

You’ve seen the stats.  Long term care is expensive, and we’re all likely to need it at some point in our lives.  The cost of spending time in a nursing home or assisted living facility adds up quickly, which is why many retirees choose to insure against it through a long term care insurance policy.

Problem is, since there’s a high likelihood of requiring long term care, insurance is an expensive proposition in its own right.  Plus, there’s no guarantee that the premium costs of a policy today don’t rise in the future.  Genworth, one of the biggest underwriters in the long term care insurance, received approval in the Q1 of 2019 to raise premiums an average of 58%.  (Insurance companies must receive approval on a state to state basis).  That’s also after the company raised costs an average of 45% in 2018, and 28% in both 2017 and 2016.  Ouch.

Are you better off crossing your fingers and hoping you don’t need expensive care for a long period of time?  Or is it better to cover this risk through an insurance policy that will cost you an arm and a leg anyway?

This post will cover the essentials of long term care insurance, including exactly how to decide whether picking up a policy is a good decision for you and your family.

 

Long Term Care: The Stats

So here’s the big question.  What are the chances you’ll ever need long term care?  According to longtermcare.gov, about 70% of people turning 65 will need long term care services at some point in their lives.  With the average annual cost of a nursing home totaling around $100,000 these days (depending on where you live), this can be a scary proposition.

The stats can be misleading, though.  Many people who need long term care services only need them for short periods of time.  And since most long term care policies have elimination periods (the waiting period before the policy starts paying out) of around 90 days, many people won’t even need care long enough for their coverage to kick in.

What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

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How to Calculate Solo 401(k) Contribution Limits

How To Calculate Solo 401k Contribution Limits

Solo 401k plans have many aliases: solo-k, uni-k, and one-participant-k, among others.  Whatever you want to call it, the retirement plan is one of my very favorite for small business owners without eligible participants.  They’re easy to set up, inexpensive to operate, and simple to maintain.

One of the few downsides of solo 401k’s is that they do have one murky intricacy: determining the maximum amount you can contribute in a given year.

This post will cover how to calculate solo 401k contribution limits.  We’ll cover the contribution calculations, the deadlines, and everything else you need to know about the accounts.

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6 Reasons Basic Estate Planning is So Important for Business Owners

In general I am not a fan of “listicles”.  They feel like a cheap, click-baity, headline grabbing way to produce content and drive traffic to your website.  Reading them can feel…yucky.  So I typically try to avoid publishing them.  I care greatly about the integrity of this site, and avoid content that I don’t think is genuinely valuable.

Recently I’ve run across a number business owners who’ve done ZERO estate planning.  No idea who steps in to run their business if they’re not around.  No will.  No trust.  Nothing.

This is pretty common, unfortunately.  Hundreds of thousands of small businesses out there have done no estate or succession planning.  A study of 200 by Wilmington Trust found that 58% had no plan in place whatsoeverI’ve written on this subject recently.  Because this is such an important topic, I’m going to break my rule about listicles today to drive the point home.  (Hey, in moderation they can be an effective way to communicate.  Who doesn’t like digestible, bite sized snippets?).

Here are my top six reasons estate planning is so important for business owners.

 

 #1: You & Your Family Probably Depend On It

For most business owners I speak with about financial matters, a substantial portion of their net worth consists the equity in their business.  And when I say substantial, I mean up to 75-80%.  Without any type of plan in place, there’s a very high likelihood that the value of this equity dissolves entirely if you become incapacitated or die unexpectedly.

Even if you have a long term disability insurance policy in place, losing the equity in your business would probably have a significant financial impact on your family.  Having a succession plan in place in just in case something does happen is the only way to preserve your equity.  And therefore your family’s balance sheet.

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How Long Is Your Runway? Establishing a Cash Reserve When Starting a Business

Starting a business involves a great deal of risk.  You’ve probably run across this statistic from the small business administration before: 30% of new businesses fail in the first 12 months of operations.  50% fail in the first 5 years, and 66% fail in the first 10.  The odds are not terribly good that a new venture will grow into a viable company.

For many businesses that do end up failing, the problem usually isn’t that there’s no market for new product or service and the founder’s idea doesn’t work.  The problem is that the founder runs out of money.  I’ve heard the story at least a dozen times: entrepreneur quits a stable job to start a new business.  Their objective is to make the new venture profitable enough to fund their living expenses before their savings run out.  It takes a little longer to get up and running than initially thought, and their savings accounts falls to dangerously low levels.  They can’t hold out any longer, and are forced to cease operations, take a step back, and find a job that offers a steady income.

The amount of cash you have in the bank is commonly known as your “runway”.  The longer your runway, the more likely a business will succeed.  So how long should your runway be, exactly, when starting a business?  If you’re about to take the leap into entrepreneurship, these are the exact steps I’d take to figure that out.

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A Beginner's Guide to Cash Balance Plans

A Beginner’s Guide to Cash Balance Plans

In my financial planning practice I work with a good number of business owners who want to make aggressive contributions to their tax deferred retirement accounts.  This helps put them on strong footing for retirement, but also provides a generous tax deduction.  While the 401k plan is the primary retirement plan most business owners are familiar with, a cash balance plans is one I often recommend in addition.  In fact, cash balance plans can actually allow for far greater contributions & tax advantages.

A cash balance plan could be a good fit if you’d like to contribute over $50,000 per year to a tax advantaged retirement plan.  They don’t come without their nuances though.  This guide will explain how cash balance plans work and whether they might be a good fit for you.

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It's Never too Early to Start a Succession Plan

It’s Never Too Early to Start a Succession Plan

So here’s a topic that all business owners have thought about but few have taken action on: succession planning.  I was reading a study by Wilmington Trust the other day that polled 200 different owners of privately held businesses.  Personally, I’ve yet to meet a business owner who doesn’t agree that succession planning is important to their company and stakeholders.  Yet in this study, 58% of the businesses polled don’t have one in place!

Successions impact…everything: your family, your legacy, your finances, your employees, your partners, your customers, your stakeholders, and anyone else who touches your company.  My guess is that you want all these pieces intact throughout your transition and after you leave.  Yet most business owners don’t tackle the issue until a) it’s high time to exit, or b) they’re forced to for a reason out of their control.

Why?  Many people start to realize that the emotions involved are heavy and deep.  Your business is probably something that you’ve poured your heart and soul into for a long period of time.  You may have taken significant financial risks that have impacted your family along the way.  The decision making required in succession planning brings up a lot of emotion, and many business owners prefer to kick the can down the road rather than deal with them.

Problem is, there are many situations out of our control that could force a succession at an inconvenient time.  Health problems, car accidents, or even changes in the economy or your industry could easily force your hand.  Rather than rush into a transition unprepared (and in a potential fire sale), you’ll reach a far more desirable outcome when your succession is planned for.  What happens if you get into an accident and come out with diminished mental capacity?  What happens if you have a heart attack & die tomorrow?  What’s the game plan?  Who will step in, and how will your family, employees, customers, and other stakeholders be taken care of?  These are the questions a good succession plan answers.  They’re also the questions that must be made while you’re in a calm, stable, and clear state of mind.

 

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Investing in Yourself as an Entrepreneur

Investing In Yourself as an Entrepreneur

Many of us feel an innate need to make contributions to tax advantaged retirement plans every year.  When it comes to personal finance, much of what we read, hear, and see in the media centers on plowing money into your 401k every single year, no matter what.

In general it’s great advice.  Save early and often, and take advantaged of tax deferred compound income.  And if you’re lucky, your employer might match your contributions or make a profit sharing contribution.  If we’re going to build up enough savings to sustain our lifestyle through retirement, this makes perfect sense.

Every once in a while I’ll speak with an entrepreneur who is really working hard to build their business, but they can’t quite scratch together enough cash to fund their retirement plan for the year.  They’re putting all their effort into their company and things are still just a bit tight financially.  They feel like they should be contributing to the 401k they set up for themselves and their employees, but they can’t quite pull the funds together to do so.

For many business owners I speak with, the fact that they can’t fund their 401k for the year makes them feel inadequate.  Like they’re not good at their job.  Like they’re unsuccessful.

I wanted to write a post on this topic because entrepreneurs who feel this way are missing the forest from the trees.  Regardless of whether you contribute to a retirement plan in a certain year, it’s far more important to sustain & grow your business.  Because if you can find a way to grow your business each year, the increased value in your ownership stake will dwarf what you could ever contribute to 401k!

 

It’s OK to Skip a Few 401(k) Contributions

Aswath Damodaran is a professor at NYU who teaches corporate finance, investing, and business valuation.  He publishes estimates of EBITDA multiple benchmarks for use by his students, and anyone else who’s interested.  EBITDA is an accounting measure that stands for “earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, or amortization”.  It’s a decent proxy for free cash flow, and is often used in quick and dirty business valuations.

For example, let’s say your business does $350,000 in revenue one year.  If your costs & operating expenses totaled $250,000, you’d be left with EBITDA of $100,000.  Here are Professor Damodaran’s valuation estimates for 2018.  The list of multiples ranges from 5-6x EBITDA on the low end to nearly 20x on the high end.  Meaning, it’s very possible that a business with $100,000 in recurring annual EBITDA is worth at least $500,000 ($100,000 * 5).

Now, when I mean quick and dirty, this example is very quick, and very dirty.  Business valuation is a field of its own, and not something I claim to be half way competent in.  There are a ton of factors that go into what a business is worth, and EBITDA certainly doesn’t paint the whole picture.  Nevertheless, the takeaway is important: if you can build a business with recurring annual revenue, that will persist even if you’re not around to drive sales, there’s a good chance you’re creating far more wealth than what you would maxing out your 401k contributions.

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Should Your Portfolio Change After You Retire?

Should Your Portfolio Change After You Retire?

One question that’s come up several times over the last couple months centers on whether your portfolio should change after you retire.  In fact, one person I’ve spoken with recently assumed that once he retired, his advisor would by default sell all the stock funds in his accounts and replace them with income producing bonds.

Typically the longer your time horizon, the more risk you have the capacity to take in your investment portfolio.  Most people in their 20s and 30s have a high capacity to take risk, since they have a long time until they’ll need to live off their savings.  A significant portfolio loss won’t impact their life, and they have a long time to recover.  Because of that, many choose to hold mostly equities in their retirement accounts since they’ll provide the greatest long term returns.

The closer you get to retirement, the lower your capacity to take risk.  Prudent investors tend to shift their asset allocations more and more toward bonds as this progression evolves.  But for most people it should level out at some point.  Most of us will need some growth out of our portfolios in retirement if our assets are going to last the rest of our lives, meaning that we probably don’t want to be 100% in bonds.

But how should our investment strategy change when transitioning from the accumulation to the distribution phases of our lives, and should it change at all?  This post will explore the issues, and what you might consider when making the transition yourself.

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Breaking Down the Industry for Financial Advice

Breaking Down the Industry for Financial Advice

The industry for financial advice is confusing.  Professionals in the business of helping the public with their personal finances work for different types of companies, are compensated in different ways, and have varying standard by which they’re required to treat their clients.

This is my 13th year in the industry.  Though my experience probably gives me more knowledge than the average consumer, there are quite a few I’m confused by all the layers at play.  (Yeah yeah, there’s a joke to be made there).  Whether it’s my cognitive abilities or whether the industry is in fact confusing, this post will attempt to break down & describe the industry for financial advice.  I’ll split this up into a few statistics, how advisors are compensated, one of the major problems this structure creates, and how you might interview an advisor you’re considering.

 

The Numbers

There are a lot of financial professionals in the United States.  FINRA (Financial Industry Regulatory Authority), is the national organization that keeps track of advisor licensing and currently lists about 630,000 representatives registered to deliver financial advice.  Now, many of those are not in the direct business of financial advice.  They may be investment bankers, they may be operational staff, and they may be running narrow products and services like managed futures or commodities strategies.  None of these are what I’d consider to be in the business of providing financial advice or planning services.

Cerulli Associates is a research company that does a much better job putting a finger on the actual number of people delivering some type of financial advice across the country.  Their most recent study estimated about 311,000, which includes professionals across all industry channels.  Of those 311,000, only about 50% deliver financial planning services.  Meaning, there are more or less 155,000 financial professionals in the US directly delivering advice and planning services.  This seems surprisingly low to me, given that there are about 125 million households across the country.  That means that if only half of the households in the US worked with a financial planner or advisor, each advisor would need to serve over 400 households!

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