What I Learned at FinCon2019

What I Learned at Fincon19

Like most jobs, my work requires a little bit of travel every year.  Since we moved down to Sacramento from Portland, I head back up to Oregon 2-3 times per year to see clients.  I also attend 2-3 conferences each year, to keep abreast of what’s going on in the industry and to make sure I’m consistently able to deliver the best advice to my clients.

This year I had two conferences on the agenda.  The first conference I had penciled was one I’ve been trying to attend for several years: FinCon.  FinCon is a gathering of bloggers, podcasters, YouTubers, reporters, financial planners, and others who produce or promote financial content.  FinCon was held in Washington D.C. this year, directly before the second conference on my agenda: XYPN Live, which I just returned from this week.

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How to Evaluate Real Estate Investments

How to Evaluate a Real Estate Investment

The concept of acquiring rental properties as a means to build passive income has become exceptionally popular recently.  In fact, it’s difficult to peruse the internet for content on personal finance without bumping into videos/podcasts/blogs/courses on how to build passive income through real estate investing.

My take on real estate investing is that it can indeed be a wonderful complement to your investment portfolio.  But the conditions need to be just right.  And given how quickly housing prices have risen since the depths of the financial crisis in 2009, the circumstances today are rarely compelling.

As you can imagine, this is a conversation I have with clients frequently.  Some have an existing property we need to evaluate.  Others fall in love with the idea of putting in sweat equity now & building an empire of properties that kick off income over time.  This sounds nice in theory, but in my experience rarely pencils out.  (At least of the opportunities I’ve seen recently in California & Oregon).

This post will explore how to evaluate real estate investing opportunities.  We’ll cover cash flow, return on investment, and go through a real life scenario of a property I pulled from Zillow.com.

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72(t) Distributions: The Ultimate Guide to Early Retirement

72t Distributions: The Ultimate Guide to Early Retirement

What’s the most common piece of retirement advice you’ve ever heard?  I bet it has something to do with tax advantaged retirement savings.  Most people are inundated with voices telling them to start saving early and take advantage of tax deferrals.  It’s solid advice.  Saving tax deferred money through IRAs, 401(k) plans, and other retirement vehicles is a wonderful way to grow your wealth over time.

The downside?  Those pesky withdrawal penalties.  The IRS will typically ding you 10% if you withdraw from these accounts before turning 59 1/2.  This can pose a problem if you’re considering an early retirement.  Fortunately there are a few loopholes.  eight of them, in fact:

  1. Roll withdrawals into another IRA or qualified account within 60 days
  2. Use withdrawals to pay qualified higher education expenses
  3. Take withdrawals due to disability
  4. Take withdrawals due to death
  5. Use withdrawals for a qualified first-time home purchase up to a lifetime max of $10,000
  6. Use withdrawals to pay medical expenses in excess of 7.5% of adjusted gross income
  7. As an unemployed person, take withdrawals for the payment of health insurance premiums
  8. Take substantially equal periodic payments pursuant to rule 72t

For those of you interested in an early retirement, the final loophole is likely the most interesting to you.

According to rule 72t, you may take withdrawals from your qualified retirement accounts and IRAs free of penalty, IF you take them in “substantially equal period payments”.

This post explores how.

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Case Study: Retiring With $1,000,000

Case Study: Retiring With $1,000,000

Those of you who know me know that I’m a massive baseball fan.  And when it comes to famous quotes from baseball players, one person comes to mind more than any other: Yogi Berra.

Yogi Berra was a long time catcher for the Yankees and had an incredible hall of fame career.  He was equally known for his head-scratching quotes, which the world has affectionately termed “Yogi-isms.”  Yogi didn’t comment often on financial topics, but he does have one quote that applies nicely to retirement planning:

“A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore.”

When we think about retirement planning, many people consider $1,000,000 as kind of a “golden threshold.”  They think of a million dollars as the minimum nest egg they’ll need in order to retire comfortably.  But as Yogi pointed out, being a millionaire doesn’t amount to what it used to.

So is it even possible to retire with $1,000,000 these days?

Let’s find out.  In this post we’ll explore a hypothetical couple named John and Jane.  They’ve saved $1,000,000 and want to retire, which is a very common situation for many Americans.

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What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

You’ve seen the stats.  Long term care is expensive, and we’re all likely to need it at some point in our lives.  The cost of spending time in a nursing home or assisted living facility adds up quickly, which is why many retirees choose to insure against it through a long term care insurance policy.

Problem is, since there’s a high likelihood of requiring long term care, insurance is an expensive proposition in its own right.  Plus, there’s no guarantee that the premium costs of a policy today don’t rise in the future.  Genworth, one of the biggest underwriters in the long term care insurance, received approval in the Q1 of 2019 to raise premiums an average of 58%.  (Insurance companies must receive approval on a state to state basis).  That’s also after the company raised costs an average of 45% in 2018, and 28% in both 2017 and 2016.  Ouch.

Are you better off crossing your fingers and hoping you don’t need expensive care for a long period of time?  Or is it better to cover this risk through an insurance policy that will cost you an arm and a leg anyway?

This post will cover the essentials of long term care insurance, including exactly how to decide whether picking up a policy is a good decision for you and your family.

 

Long Term Care: The Stats

So here’s the big question.  What are the chances you’ll ever need long term care?  According to longtermcare.gov, about 70% of people turning 65 will need long term care services at some point in their lives.  With the average annual cost of a nursing home totaling around $100,000 these days (depending on where you live), this can be a scary proposition.

The stats can be misleading, though.  Many people who need long term care services only need them for short periods of time.  And since most long term care policies have elimination periods (the waiting period before the policy starts paying out) of around 90 days, many people won’t even need care long enough for their coverage to kick in.

What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

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How to Calculate Solo 401(k) Contribution Limits

How To Calculate Solo 401k Contribution Limits

Solo 401k plans have many aliases: solo-k, uni-k, and one-participant-k, among others.  Whatever you want to call it, the retirement plan is one of my very favorite for small business owners without eligible participants.  They’re easy to set up, inexpensive to operate, and simple to maintain.

One of the few downsides of solo 401k’s is that they do have one murky intricacy: determining the maximum amount you can contribute in a given year.

This post will cover how to calculate solo 401k contribution limits.  We’ll cover the contribution calculations, the deadlines, and everything else you need to know about the accounts.

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6 Reasons Basic Estate Planning is So Important for Business Owners

In general I am not a fan of “listicles”.  They feel like a cheap, click-baity, headline grabbing way to produce content and drive traffic to your website.  Reading them can feel…yucky.  So I typically try to avoid publishing them.  I care greatly about the integrity of this site, and avoid content that I don’t think is genuinely valuable.

Recently I’ve run across a number business owners who’ve done ZERO estate planning.  No idea who steps in to run their business if they’re not around.  No will.  No trust.  Nothing.

This is pretty common, unfortunately.  Hundreds of thousands of small businesses out there have done no estate or succession planning.  A study of 200 by Wilmington Trust found that 58% had no plan in place whatsoeverI’ve written on this subject recently.  Because this is such an important topic, I’m going to break my rule about listicles today to drive the point home.  (Hey, in moderation they can be an effective way to communicate.  Who doesn’t like digestible, bite sized snippets?).

Here are my top six reasons estate planning is so important for business owners.

 

 #1: You & Your Family Probably Depend On It

For most business owners I speak with about financial matters, a substantial portion of their net worth consists the equity in their business.  And when I say substantial, I mean up to 75-80%.  Without any type of plan in place, there’s a very high likelihood that the value of this equity dissolves entirely if you become incapacitated or die unexpectedly.

Even if you have a long term disability insurance policy in place, losing the equity in your business would probably have a significant financial impact on your family.  Having a succession plan in place in just in case something does happen is the only way to preserve your equity.  And therefore your family’s balance sheet.

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How Long Is Your Runway? Establishing a Cash Reserve When Starting a Business

Starting a business involves a great deal of risk.  You’ve probably run across this statistic from the small business administration before: 30% of new businesses fail in the first 12 months of operations.  50% fail in the first 5 years, and 66% fail in the first 10.  The odds are not terribly good that a new venture will grow into a viable company.

For many businesses that do end up failing, the problem usually isn’t that there’s no market for new product or service and the founder’s idea doesn’t work.  The problem is that the founder runs out of money.  I’ve heard the story at least a dozen times: entrepreneur quits a stable job to start a new business.  Their objective is to make the new venture profitable enough to fund their living expenses before their savings run out.  It takes a little longer to get up and running than initially thought, and their savings accounts falls to dangerously low levels.  They can’t hold out any longer, and are forced to cease operations, take a step back, and find a job that offers a steady income.

The amount of cash you have in the bank is commonly known as your “runway”.  The longer your runway, the more likely a business will succeed.  So how long should your runway be, exactly, when starting a business?  If you’re about to take the leap into entrepreneurship, these are the exact steps I’d take to figure that out.

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A Beginner's Guide to Cash Balance Plans

A Beginner’s Guide to Cash Balance Plans

In my financial planning practice I work with a good number of business owners who want to make aggressive contributions to their tax deferred retirement accounts.  This helps put them on strong footing for retirement, but also provides a generous tax deduction.  While the 401k plan is the primary retirement plan most business owners are familiar with, a cash balance plans is one I often recommend in addition.  In fact, cash balance plans can actually allow for far greater contributions & tax advantages.

A cash balance plan could be a good fit if you’d like to contribute over $50,000 per year to a tax advantaged retirement plan.  They don’t come without their nuances though.  This guide will explain how cash balance plans work and whether they might be a good fit for you.

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