What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

You’ve seen the stats.  Long term care is expensive, and we’re all likely to need it at some point in our lives.  The cost of spending time in a nursing home or assisted living facility adds up quickly, which is why many retirees choose to insure against it through a long term care insurance policy.

Problem is, since there’s a high likelihood of requiring long term care, insurance is an expensive proposition in its own right.  Plus, there’s no guarantee that the premium costs of a policy today don’t rise in the future.  Genworth, one of the biggest underwriters in the long term care insurance, received approval in the Q1 of 2019 to raise premiums an average of 58%.  (Insurance companies must receive approval on a state to state basis).  That’s also after the company raised costs an average of 45% in 2018, and 28% in both 2017 and 2016.  Ouch.

Are you better off crossing your fingers and hoping you don’t need expensive care for a long period of time?  Or is it better to cover this risk through an insurance policy that will cost you an arm and a leg anyway?

This post will cover the essentials of long term care insurance, including exactly how to decide whether picking up a policy is a good decision for you and your family.

 

Long Term Care: The Stats

So here’s the big question.  What are the chances you’ll ever need long term care?  According to longtermcare.gov, about 70% of people turning 65 will need long term care services at some point in their lives.  With the average annual cost of a nursing home totaling around $100,000 these days (depending on where you live), this can be a scary proposition.

The stats can be misleading, though.  Many people who need long term care services only need them for short periods of time.  And since most long term care policies have elimination periods (the waiting period before the policy starts paying out) of around 90 days, many people won’t even need care long enough for their coverage to kick in.

What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

What Everyone Ought to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

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What You Need to Know About the SECURE Act Retirement Bill

What You Should Know About the SECURE Act Retirement Bill

Every now and then, lawmakers in Washington make noise about changing various sections of the tax advantaged retirement accounts I’m so fond of recommending to my clients.  Now that we’re living substantially longer, and a greater portion of our lives is actually spent in retirement, there’s a good argument that we should increase age limits, mandatory distributions, and other rules governing IRAs, 401(k)s and other types of accounts.

I usually don’t pay much attention to this speculation until there’s a bill on the floor that has a strong chance of becoming law.  The majority of the legislation drafted in this area doesn’t get far, and often doesn’t even get out of committee.

Nevertheless, the house and senate have both recently introduced bills that would change how retirement accounts work.  I’m no political expert, and don’t have the foggiest idea what the chances are of one of these bills passing.  But from what I’m reading there’s more momentum for retirement reform now than there’s been in the last several years.  Plus, more than one client asked my thoughts on the subject recently so I felt a summary post would be appropriate.  This post will cover what happened & why it might be important to you.

 

Pending Legislation

In February the senate introduced a bill called the “Retirement Enhancement and Savings Act” (or RESA), aimed at fixing America’s retirement savings problems – both in the public and private sectors.  This isn’t the first bill on retirement reform that’s been introduced recently.  Multiple versions containing similar provisions have been introduced since 2016, which speaks to the growing interest in helping Americans save for retirement.

Meanwhile, the house passed the SECURE Retirement bill (Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act) about a week and a half ago in a 417-3 vote.  This bill contains many of the same provisions as RESA, and the bipartisan support on both sides of congress could mean one of the bills may actually make it into law sometime soon.

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Pros & Cons of Long Term Care Insurance 3 Top Arguments For & Against

Pro’s & Con’s of Long Term Care Insurance: 3 Top Arguments For & Against

I have a good number of clients who are in their mid-50s, and hearing from friends and colleagues that they should consider obtaining long term care insurance.  They’ll often quote stats about the staggering percentage of us who will need long term care services at some point in our lives, or the mention the high cost of services.

These are valid points.  But there are equally valid reasons NOT to obtain a policy.  I’ve written on long term care insurance in the past, and how to determine whether you’re a good candidate for it.  Since this is a topic that comes up in my practice with some frequency, I thought I’d devote another post to the top arguments for and against long term care insurance.  If you’re reviewing your own situation and wondering whether to obtain coverage, you should consider these six points.

Let’s start with the top arguments FOR obtaining long term care insurance:

 

1) There’s a Good Chance You’ll Need Care at Some Point

Long term care services are described (in insurance policies) as requiring help in two of six “activities of daily living”.  The six activities are:

  • Eating
  • Bathing
  • Dressing
  • Getting on and off the toilet
  • Getting in and out of bed or a chair
  • Maintaining continence

Needing help with two of these six activities is a triggering event for long term care policies.  Policyholders in this situation can make claims on their policies.

The stats say that 68% of us will require long term care (needing help in two of the six areas) at some point in our lives.  This is a staggering number.  And with longevity rising around the world, I wouldn’t be surprised to see that number climb over the next 20-30 years.

While not everyone will need help for a long period of time (many will only need some assistance for a couple weeks, maybe after recovering from surgery) chances are pretty good you’ll need a hand at some point.  Rather than relying on family or friends, long term care policies can pay for professional help in your home or a stay in a facility.

 

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8 Considerations When Protecting Your Business With Life Insurance

8 Considerations When Protecting Your Business With Life Insurance

I read a stat recently that stated 71% of small businesses depend heavily on a few individual owners and/or employees.  This number makes quite a bit of sense, once you consider the limited resources most small businesses have to work with.  It also presents a great deal of risk.  Losing a key employee, manager, or professional could easily be the death knell for businesses without much bench strength.

To protect themselves, their families, and their businesses from this possibility, many business owners use life insurance.  As you probably know, life insurance comes in many shapes, sizes, and forms.  Depending on your business and objectives, there is probably a way to minimize the risk of your or your colleagues’ premature death using life insurance.

There is a lot to write about on this topic – in part because there is such a wide variety of life insurance products available.  This post will review 8 considerations when protecting your business with life insurance.  If you’re dipping your toe into the subject for the first time, this is a good place to start.

 

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Using Business Interruption Insurance to Protect Your Income

Using Business Interruption Insurance to Protect Your Income

Picture it now…

You own a thriving art supply store in your home town of New Orleans.  You’ve put years of your life and thousands of dollars into building the store into what it is now.  You make a nice living, and the business mostly runs itself at this point.

Then Hurricane Katrina comes to town.  The building you lease is ruined.  Your storefront and merchandise are ruined.  You have no cash flow to pay creditors, and are forced to close the store.

This is a pretty extreme example, but is exactly what happened to thousands of businesses in the wake of the disaster in 2005.  It’s also a risk that can be completely covered with business interruption insurance.

Virtually any disaster that is out of your control and risks your business’s profitability can be covered in a business interruption policy.  In other words, you can protect business profits and your personal income from a fire, flooding, earthquake, or other disaster.

This post will cover the ins and outs of business interruption insurance.  We’ll address what it does and doesn’t cover, when you should consider buying it, how much coverage you need, and how to purchase a policy.
 

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The Overwhelming Case Against Whole Life Insurance

The Overwhelming Case Against Whole Life Insurance

Insurance agents love to pitch whole life insurance.

This is sometimes a controversial topic, but the truth is that insurance agents make massive commissions on permanent life insurance when compared to term policies.  Because of this, it’s not uncommon to see agents find creative ways to work permanent life insurance into a financial plan.

The truth is that most people simply don’t need permanent insurance, and are far better served with a term policy.  Whole life insurance is costly, and offers very poor return potential.  This post will cover what whole life insurance is, and why most people are better off with lower cost alternatives.

 

How Life Insurance Works

In order to understand whole life insurance, we really need to understand term life insurance first.  With term life insurance policies, you’re paying an insurance company a monthly premium in exchange for old fashioned, plain vanilla insurance on your life.  If you die while the policy is in force, the insurance company will pay your beneficiaries a death benefit.

Since it’s a term policy, it’s only good for a certain amount of time.  Most term policies are written for 10, 20, or 30 years, and have level premiums throughout the life of the policy.

By and large, term policies are the best way to insure your life.  They’re inexpensive and straightforward.  Plus, the whole reason most people insure their lives is to protect against the chance that they die before becoming financially independent.  Once they become financially independent there’s rarely a need for life insurance.  You have enough assets to pay for your lifestyle, which can be distributed to your heirs after you go.

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The Role of Insurance in the Pursuit of Financial Independence

The Role of Insurance in the Pursuit of Financial Independence

Executive Summary:

There are many unfortunate things that can happen to us that risk our pursuit of financial independence.  Some of them we can manage & control, others we can’t.  For the “stuff” out there we can’t control, insurance allows us to transfer risk to an insurance company in exchange for a nominal premium.

This post covers the role of insurance along your pursuit toward financial independence.  It’ll also cover a prudent risk management framework.  If used correctly, financial independence no longer becomes an aspiration that may happen – it becomes an inevitability.


Financial independence is a goal many of us share here in the America.  It’s also, of course, the focus of this blog.

For the baby boomer generation, financial independence lines up very closely to the traditional American career path: enter the workforce in your 20s, put in 40-45 years, and fully retire sometime around age 65.

Younger generations are starting to explore more creative paths to financial independence, like extreme budgeting and newfangled forms of entrepreneurship.

Whatever your route to financial independence, risk is an important part of the equation.  There are many unfortunate things that sometimes happen in this world that might drag us off course, or even be catastrophic:

  • We could die or become disabled unexpectedly
  • We could wreck our car
  • We could get sick
  • We could get sued
  • Our house could burn down

These are risks that we face every single day. They jeopardize our assets, our ability to earn income or both.

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What Will Healthcare Cost In Retirement?

What Will Healthcare Cost in Retirement?

Planning for retirement takes careful preparation and a decent idea of what your budget will be once you stop working.  This can be a pretty scary process with so many unknown variables.  How much will groceries, travel, and utilities cost in 15-20 years?  How long will you live, exactly?  What if you get hurt or need help with everyday activities like getting dressed or paying the bills?

Arguably the biggest variable when we talk about retirement is the cost of healthcare.  It’s no secret that the cost of coverage and prescription drugs is increasing at an uncomfortable pace.  This post will cover the current research on what healthcare will cost in retirement, as well as the best way to put money aside for it now.

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Health Insurance for Retirees Under 65: How to Cope Until Medicare Kicks In

Health Insurance for Retirees Under 65: How to Cope Until Medicare Kicks In

If you’re planning to retire early, you might be wondering what you’ll do for health insurance coverage.  Medicare won’t kick in until you turn 65, and the rising cost of healthcare each year could translate to unknown monthly premiums and out of pocket costs.  This leaves you in a precarious situation if you don’t have another form of benefits.

Fortunately, the Affordable Care Act includes several rules designed to limit your costs.  For example, insurance companies may charge a 64 year old premiums of no more than three times those of a 21 year old.  The ACA also outlaws rejecting applications or charging more for preexisting conditions, and limits out of pocket costs to $6700 per year.

I’m not taking a stance on Obamacare here, but if you’re looking to retire early the road to health coverage is easier now than it was a few years back.  But despite the improvements, a major illness or  injury could still take a big chunk out of your retirement savings.  And as you probably know, the worst possible time to deplete your nest egg is immediately after you stop working.

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Fixed Annuity Pros and Cons: 10 Things You Need to Know

Annuities are incredibly popular instruments for retirement planning.  They come in all shapes and sizes, and while having more options can be a good thing, it can also be very confusing.  For that reason, fixed annuities are a popular way to guarantee income without wrestling with a complicated and expensive product.  Even so, buying an annuity is a major decision.  To help you weight both sides, here are 10 fixed annuity pros and cons:

 

Fixed Annuity Pros and Cons:

 

Pros:

1) Guaranteed Returns

Since fixed annuities pay you a set amount of interest (like a CD), your returns are guaranteed.  This is very useful if you’re concerned about stock market risk as you approach retirement.

 

2) Guaranteed Income

This is probably the most popular feature of fixed annuities.  You hand money to an insurance company via a fixed annuity, and in return the insurance company pays you consistent income for the rest of your life.  Your income doesn’t fluctuate due to stock markets, interest rates, or whether your rental property is leased for the month.  It’s guaranteed and reliable.

The only reason the insurance company might fail to pay this income is if they went out of business.  And even though many of us are skeptical about big companies in the financial industry, insurance companies are very unlikely to go bankrupt.  They are regulated by individual states, each of which requires them to keep a great deal of cash on hand to pay their liabilities (far more than bank reserve requirements).  Even though fixed annuities aren’t insured by the FDIC, the likelihood that you won’t receive promised retirement income is extremely low.

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